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Book

The filter bubble : how the new personalized Web is changing what we read and how we think

Pariser, Eli (Author).

Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at Sage Library System. (Show)
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Columbia Gorge Community College. (Show)
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Columbia Gorge Community College Library.

Current holds

0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Summary:

A filter bubble is a term coined by internet activist Eli Pariser in his book by the same name to describe a phenomenon in which websites use algorithms to selectively guess what information a user would like to see, based on information about the user (such as location, past click behaviour and search history). As a result, websites tend to show only information which agrees with the user's past viewpoint, effectively isolating the user in a bubble that tends to exclude contrary information.
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Circulation Modifier Age Hold Protection Active/Create Date Status Due Date
Columbia Gorge Community College Library 004.678 PARI 2012 (Text) 39705000016765 Main Collection Book None 12/05/2016 Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780143121237 (pbk.)
  • ISBN: 0143121235
  • Physical Description: 294 p. ; 20 cm.
    print
  • Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Penguin Books/Penguin Press, 2012.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Formatted Contents Note: The race for relevance -- The user is the content -- The Adderall society -- The you loop -- The public is irrelevant -- Hello, world! -- What you want, whether you want it or not -- Escape from the city of ghettos.
Summary, etc.: A filter bubble is a term coined by internet activist Eli Pariser in his book by the same name to describe a phenomenon in which websites use algorithms to selectively guess what information a user would like to see, based on information about the user (such as location, past click behaviour and search history). As a result, websites tend to show only information which agrees with the user's past viewpoint, effectively isolating the user in a bubble that tends to exclude contrary information.
Subject: Invisible Web
Semantic Web Social aspects
World Wide Web Subject access
World Wide Web Social aspects
Internet Censorship
Search Results Showing Item 2 of 2

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